Form of Life of Pope Innoncent IV - 99 

other sisters. This would be a sign of evil and an offense that would have to be seriously punished. In fact, we desire and decree that those things which should be diligently established and emended according to the form of their life and regular observance should be zealously suggested and proposed, privately and publicly, as it may best be done, to the Visitator whom they are bound to obey in all things.a Let whoever does otherwise, whether it be the abbess or the others, be appropriately punished by the Visitator, as is proper.

In a similar manner, if the chaplain is reprehensible in anything in which he cannot fittingly be supported nor should he be, let him, after he has been forewarned, be discreetly and reasonably punished by a Visitator, as is proper. If he does not wish to emend [his ways] or spurns [the warning], let him be removed altogether from the monastery by the same [Visitator].

Moreover, we decree that only the general or provincial minister of the above-mentioned Order, exercise among you the office of visitating, correcting, and reforming both in the head and in the members through themselves or through other qualified brothers [who have been] appointed by them in the general Chapter. Nevertheless, the general and the aforesaid provincials in their provinces, for a reason, can occasionally appoint someone qualified as a special Visitator from the brothers entrusted to them according to the form given by the entire gathering of ministers in the general chapter.b

9When it is possible, let there be in each monastery only one door for entering and leaving the enclosure according to the law of entering and leaving set down in this Form. And let the door be conveniently made in a high place as far as it can suitably be done, so that, from the outside, it may be reached by a portable ladder. Let this ladder, zealously secured by an iron chain, be taken up continually from the recitation of Compline to Prime

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Clare of Assisi: Early Documents, p. 99